joancotxà.bloc.cat

Altre lloc Blocat | Xarxa de blocs catalans

Author Archive

Joan Cotxà Pagans

Joan Cotxà Pagans

BTV debat sobre la independència

El dia de Sant Jordi, BTV va celebrar un debat sobre els avantatges i inconvenients d’una possible Catalunya independent. Defensant la independència hi van participar Jacint Ros, catedràtic emèrit d’Economia de la UB, Alfons López Tena, president del Cercle d’Estudis Sobiranistes i Alfons Durán Pich, Empresari. A l’altra banda de la taula, defensant la unitat d’Espanya hi van participar Miquel Porta Perales, crític i escriptor, María Teresa Guiménez Barbat, presidenta de l’Associació Ciutadans de Catalunya i Albert Aixalà, director de la Fundació Rafael Campalans.



Cap a la dreta o cap a l’esquerra?

En un d’aquests correus en cadena que circula per la xarxa hi vaig trobar aquesta curiositat. Sabríeu dir en quin sentit està girant aquesta noia? Sembla ser que si veieu que està girant cap a la dreta, està funcionant el costat dret del cervell, mentre que si veieu que està girant cap a l’esquerra, és el costat esquerra del cervell el que està funcionant. Si aconseguiu fer-la girar en el sentit que vulgueu, suposadament teniu un coeficient d’intel·ligència superior a 160.

Us recomano que feu l’experiment en grup. És curiós veure com alguns s’entussodeixen en afirmar que la manera com ho veuen és la única possible i es neguen a entendre que hi ha maneres oposades de veure exactament el mateix!



L’era de la desinformació

Stoooopid
Fa uns mesos la Pilar Pérez em va parlar d’un article publicat el 20 de juliol al The Sunday Times, que tracta sobre les dificultats creixents de concentració que tenim les generacions que vivim permanentment connectats als sistemes d’informació e les noves tecnologies. Darrerament, l’acumulació de feina em fa adonar de la ineficàcia i la manca de concentració que comporta el fet d’estar

Unes hipòtesis encara per contrastar però
Així doncs, gràcies al Google, he torbat l’article esmentat, i que reprodueixo a continuació.


July 20, 2008

Why the Google generation isn%u2019t as smart as it thinks

The digital age is destroying us by ruining our ability to concentrate

On Wednesday I received 72 e-mails, not counting junk, and only two text
messages. It was a quiet day but, then again, I%u2019m not including the
telephone calls. I%u2019m also not including the deafening and pointless
announcements on a train journey to Wakefield %u2013 use a screen, jerks %u2013 the
piercingly loud telephone conversations of unsocialised adults and the
screaming of untamed brats. And, come to think of it, why not include the
junk e-mails? They also interrupt. There were 38. Oh and I%u2019d better throw in
the 400-odd news alerts that I receive from all the websites I monitor via
my iPhone.
[@more@]

I was %u2013 the irony! %u2013 trying to read a book called Distracted: The Erosion of
Attention and the Coming Dark Age by Maggie Jackson. Crushed in my train, I
had become the embodiment of T S Eliot%u2019s great summary of the modern
predicament: %u201CDistracted from distraction by distraction%u201D. This is, you
might think, a pretty standard, vaguely comic vignette of modern life %u2013 man
harassed by self-inflicted technology. And so it is. We%u2019re all distracted,
we%u2019re all interrupted. How foolish we are! But, listen carefully, it%u2019s
killing me and it%u2019s killing you.

David Meyer is professor of psychology at the University of Michigan. In 1995
his son was killed by a distracted driver who ran a red light. Meyer%u2019s
speciality was attention: how we focus on one thing rather than another.
Attention is the golden key to the mystery of human consciousness; it might
one day tell us how we make the world in our heads. Attention comes
naturally to us; attending to what matters is how we survive and define
ourselves.

The opposite of attention is distraction, an unnatural condition and one that,
as Meyer discovered in 1995, kills. Now he is convinced that chronic,
long-term distraction is as dangerous as cigarette smoking. In particular,
there is the great myth of multitasking. No human being, he says, can
effectively write an e-mail and speak on the telephone. Both activities use
language and the language channel in the brain can%u2019t cope. Multitaskers fool
themselves by rapidly switching attention and, as a result, their output
deteriorates.

The same thing happens if you talk on a mobile phone while driving %u2013 even
legally with a hands-free kit. You listen to language on the phone and lose
the ability to take in the language of road signs. Worst of all is if your
caller describes something visual, a wallpaper pattern, a view. As you
imagine this, your visual channel gets clogged and you start losing your
sense of the road ahead. Distraction kills %u2013 you or others.

Chronic distraction, from which we all now suffer, kills you more slowly.
Meyer says there is evidence that people in chronically distracted jobs are,
in early middle age, appearing with the same symptoms of burn-out as air
traffic controllers. They might have stress-related diseases, even
irreversible brain damage. But the damage is not caused by overwork, it%u2019s
caused by multiple distracted work. One American study found that
interruptions take up 2.1 hours of the average knowledge worker%u2019s day. This,
it was estimated, cost the US economy $588 billion a year. Yet the rabidly
multitasking distractee is seen as some kind of social and economic ideal.

Meyer tells me that he sees part of his job as warning as many people as
possible of the dangers of the distracted world we are creating. Other
voices, particularly in America, have joined the chorus of dismay. Jackson%u2019s
book warns of a new Dark Age: %u201CAs our attentional skills are squandered, we
are plunging into a culture of mistrust, skimming and a dehumanising merger
between man and machine.%u201D

Mark Bauerlein, professor of English at Emory University in Atlanta, has just
written The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young
Americans and Jeopardises Our Future. He portrays a bibliophobic generation
of teens, incapable of sustaining concentration long enough to read a book.
And learning a poem by heart just strikes them as dumb.

In an influential essay in The Atlantic magazine, Nicholas Carr asks: %u201CIs
Google making us stupid?%u201D Carr, a chronic distractee like the rest of us,
noticed that he was finding it increasingly difficult to immerse himself in
a book or a long article %u2013 %u201CThe deep reading that used to come naturally has
become a struggle.%u201D

Instead he now Googles his way though life, scanning and skimming, not pausing
to think, to absorb. He feels himself being hollowed out by %u201Cthe replacement
of complex inner density with a new kind of self %u2013 evolving under the
pressure of information overload and the technology of the %u2018instantly
available%u2019%u201D.

%u201CThe important thing,%u201D he tells me, %u201Cis that we now go outside of ourselves to
make all the connections that we used to make inside of ourselves.%u201D The
attending self is enfeebled as its functions are transferred to cyberspace.

%u201CThe next generation will not grieve because they will not know what they have
lost,%u201D says Bill McKibben, the great environmentalist.

McKibben%u2019s hero is Henry Thoreau, who, in the 19th century, cut himself off
from the distractions of industrialising America to live in quiet
contemplation by Walden Pond in Massachusetts. He was, says McKibben,
%u201Cincredibly prescient%u201D. McKibben can%u2019t live that life, though. He must
organise his global warming campaigns through the internet and suffer and
react to the beeping pleading of the incoming e-mail.

%u201CI feel that much of my life is ebbing away in the tide of minute-by-minute
distraction . . . I%u2019m not certain what the effect on the world will be. But
psychologists do say that intense close engagement with things does provide
the most human satisfaction.%u201D The psychologists are right. McKibben
describes himself as %u201Cloving novelty%u201D and yet %u201Ccraving depth%u201D, the
contemporary predicament in a nutshell.

Ironically, the companies most active in denying us our craving for depth, the
great distracters %u2013 Microsoft, Google, IBM, Intel %u2013 are trying to do
something about this. They have formed the Information Overload Research
Group, %u201Cdedicated to promoting solutions to e-mail overload and
interruptions%u201D. None of this will work, of course, because of the
overwhelming economic forces involved. People make big money out of
distracting us. So what can be done?

The first issue is the determination of the distracters to create young
distractees. Television was the first culprit. Tests clearly show that a
switched-on television reduces the quality and quantity of interaction
between children and their parents. The internet multiplies the effect a
thousandfold. Paradoxically, the supreme information provider also has the
effect of reducing information intake.

Bauerlein is 49. As a child, he says, he learnt about the Vietnam war from
Walter Cronkite, the great television news anchor of the time. Now teenagers
just go to their laptops on coming home from school and sink into their
online cocoon. But this isn%u2019t the informational paradise dreamt of by Bill
Gates and Google: 90% of sites visited by teenagers are social networks.
They are immersed not in knowledge but in %u201Cgossip and social banter%u201D.

%u201CThey don%u2019t,%u201D says Bauerlein, %u201Cgrow up.%u201D They are %u201Cliving off the thrill of
peer attention. Meanwhile, their intellects refuse the cultural and civic
inheritance that has made us what we are now%u201D.

The hyper-connectivity of the young is bewildering. Jackson tells me that one
study looked at five years of e-mail activity of a 24-year-old. He was found
to have connections with 11.7m people. Most of these connections would be
pretty threadbare. But that, in a way, is the point. All internet
connections are threadbare. They lack the complexity and depth of real-world
interactions. This is concealed by the language.

Join Facebook or MySpace and you suddenly have %u201Cfriends%u201D all over the place.
Of course, you don%u2019t. These are just casual, tenuous electronic pings.
Nothing could be further removed from the idea of friendship.

These connections are severed as quickly as they are taken up %u2013 with the click
of a mouse. Jackson and everyone else I spoke to was alarmed by the
potential impact on real-world relationships. Teenagers are being groomed to
think others can be picked up on a whim and dropped because of a mood or
some slight offence. The fear is that the idea of sticking with another
through thick and thin %u2013 the very essence of friendship and love %u2013 will come
to seem absurd, uncool, meaningless.

One irony that lies behind all this is the myth that children are good at this
stuff. Adults often joke that their 10-year-old has to fix the computer. But
it%u2019s not true. Studies show older people are generally more adept with
computers than younger. This is because, like all multitaskers, the kids are
deluding themselves into thinking that busy-ness is depth when, in fact,
they are skimming the surface of cyberspace as surely as they are skimming
the surface of life. It takes an adult imagination to discriminate, to make
judgments; and those are the only skills that really matter.

The concern of all these writers and thinkers is that it is precisely these
skills that will vanish from the world as we become infantilised
cyber-serfs, our entertainments and impulses maintained and controlled by
the techno-geek aristocracy. They have all noted %u2013 either in themselves or
in others %u2013 diminishing attention spans, inability to focus, a loss of the
meditative mode. %u201CI can%u2019t read War and Peace any more,%u201D confessed one of
Carr%u2019s friends. %u201CI%u2019ve lost the ability to do that. Even a blog post of more
than three or four paragraphs is too much to absorb. I skim it.%u201D

The computer is training us not to attend, to drown in the sea of information
rather than to swim. Jackson thinks this can be fixed. The brain is
malleable. Just as it can be trained to be distracted, so it can be trained
to pay attention. Education and work can be restructured to teach and
propagate the skills of concentration and focus. People can be taught to
turn off, to ignore the beep and the ping.

Bauerlein, dismayed by his distracted students, is not optimistic. Multiple
distraction might, he admits, be a phase, and in time society will
self-correct. But the sheer power of the forces of distraction is such that
he thinks this will not happen.

This, for him, puts democracy at risk. It is a form of government that puts %u201Ca
heavy burden of responsibility on our citizens%u201D. But if they think Paris is
in England and they can%u2019t find Iraq on a map because their world is a social
network of %u201Cfriends%u201D %u2013 examples of appalling ignorance recently found in
American teenagers %u2013 how can they be expected to shoulder that burden?

This may all be a moral panic, a severe case of the older generation wagging
its finger at the young. It was ever thus. But what is new is the assiduity
with which companies and institutions are selling us the tools of
distraction. Every new device on the market is, to return to Eliot, %u201CFilled
with fancies and empty of meaning / Tumid apathy with no concentration%u201D.

These things do make our lives easier, but only by destroying the very selves
that should be protesting at every distraction, demanding peace, quiet and
contemplation. The distracters have product to shift, and it%u2019s shifting. On
the train to Wakefield, with my new 3G iPhone, distracted from distraction
by distraction, I saw the future and, to my horror, it worked.



L’era de la desinformació?

StoooopidFa uns mesos la Pilar Pérez em va parlar d’un article escrit per Brian Appleyard i publicat el 20 de juliol al The Sunday Times, que tracta sobre les dificultats creixents de concentració que tenim les generacions que vivim permanentment connectats als sistemes d’informació i comunicació relacionats amb les noves tecnologies. Segons l’autor de l’article, les interrupcions constants dels correus electrònics, missatges de mòbil i trucades telefòniques i el fet d’utilitzar les noves tecnologies per evitar el més mínim esforç mental acaben tenint  com a conseqüència un atrofiament de les nostres capacitats intel·lectuals.

Potser sembla una hipòtesi excessivament catastrofista, però en tot cas, no sona gens exorbitada. Només cal trobar-se un mateix davant l’ordinador, amb desenes de finestres obertes i intentant fer 5 coses a l’hora sense ser capaç d’enllstir-ne cap per adonar-se que la situació descrita per l’autor reflecteix la quotidianitat de la major part dels membres de la nostra generació.

Intentant defensar-se de les acusacions que li imputa l’autor, el Google no ha trigat ni 10 segons a trobar l’article del Sunday Times que us reprodueixo a continuació.


Why the Google generation isn’t as smart as it thinks

The digital age is destroying us by ruining our ability to concentrate, warns Bryan Appleyard

July 20, 2008

On Wednesday I received 72 e-mails, not counting junk, and only two text
messages. It was a quiet day but, then again, I’m not including the
telephone calls. I’m also not including the deafening and pointless
announcements on a train journey to Wakefield – use a screen, jerks – the
piercingly loud telephone conversations of unsocialised adults and the
screaming of untamed brats. And, come to think of it, why not include the
junk e-mails? They also interrupt. There were 38. Oh and I’d better throw in
the 400-odd news alerts that I receive from all the websites I monitor via
my iPhone.
[@more@]

I was – the irony! – trying to read a book called Distracted: The Erosion of
Attention and the Coming Dark Age by Maggie Jackson. Crushed in my train, I
had become the embodiment of T S Eliot’s great summary of the modern
predicament: “Distracted from distraction by distraction”. This is, you
might think, a pretty standard, vaguely comic vignette of modern life – man
harassed by self-inflicted technology. And so it is. We’re all distracted,
we’re all interrupted. How foolish we are! But, listen carefully, it’s
killing me and it’s killing you.

David Meyer is professor of psychology at the University of Michigan. In 1995
his son was killed by a distracted driver who ran a red light. Meyer’s
speciality was attention: how we focus on one thing rather than another.
Attention is the golden key to the mystery of human consciousness; it might
one day tell us how we make the world in our heads. Attention comes
naturally to us; attending to what matters is how we survive and define
ourselves.

The opposite of attention is distraction, an unnatural condition and one that,
as Meyer discovered in 1995, kills. Now he is convinced that chronic,
long-term distraction is as dangerous as cigarette smoking. In particular,
there is the great myth of multitasking. No human being, he says, can
effectively write an e-mail and speak on the telephone. Both activities use
language and the language channel in the brain can’t cope. Multitaskers fool
themselves by rapidly switching attention and, as a result, their output
deteriorates.

The same thing happens if you talk on a mobile phone while driving – even
legally with a hands-free kit. You listen to language on the phone and lose
the ability to take in the language of road signs. Worst of all is if your
caller describes something visual, a wallpaper pattern, a view. As you
imagine this, your visual channel gets clogged and you start losing your
sense of the road ahead. Distraction kills – you or others.

Chronic distraction, from which we all now suffer, kills you more slowly.
Meyer says there is evidence that people in chronically distracted jobs are,
in early middle age, appearing with the same symptoms of burn-out as air
traffic controllers. They might have stress-related diseases, even
irreversible brain damage. But the damage is not caused by overwork, it’s
caused by multiple distracted work. One American study found that
interruptions take up 2.1 hours of the average knowledge worker’s day. This,
it was estimated, cost the US economy $588 billion a year. Yet the rabidly
multitasking distractee is seen as some kind of social and economic ideal.

Meyer tells me that he sees part of his job as warning as many people as
possible of the dangers of the distracted world we are creating. Other
voices, particularly in America, have joined the chorus of dismay. Jackson’s
book warns of a new Dark Age: “As our attentional skills are squandered, we
are plunging into a culture of mistrust, skimming and a dehumanising merger
between man and machine.”

Mark Bauerlein, professor of English at Emory University in Atlanta, has just
written The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young
Americans and Jeopardises Our Future. He portrays a bibliophobic generation
of teens, incapable of sustaining concentration long enough to read a book.
And learning a poem by heart just strikes them as dumb.

In an influential essay in The Atlantic magazine, Nicholas Carr asks: “Is
Google making us stupid?” Carr, a chronic distractee like the rest of us,
noticed that he was finding it increasingly difficult to immerse himself in
a book or a long article – “The deep reading that used to come naturally has
become a struggle.”

Instead he now Googles his way though life, scanning and skimming, not pausing
to think, to absorb. He feels himself being hollowed out by “the replacement
of complex inner density with a new kind of self – evolving under the
pressure of information overload and the technology of the ‘instantly
available’”.

“The important thing,” he tells me, “is that we now go outside of ourselves to
make all the connections that we used to make inside of ourselves.” The
attending self is enfeebled as its functions are transferred to cyberspace.

“The next generation will not grieve because they will not know what they have
lost,” says Bill McKibben, the great environmentalist.

McKibben’s hero is Henry Thoreau, who, in the 19th century, cut himself off
from the distractions of industrialising America to live in quiet
contemplation by Walden Pond in Massachusetts. He was, says McKibben,
“incredibly prescient”. McKibben can’t live that life, though. He must
organise his global warming campaigns through the internet and suffer and
react to the beeping pleading of the incoming e-mail.

“I feel that much of my life is ebbing away in the tide of minute-by-minute
distraction . . . I’m not certain what the effect on the world will be. But
psychologists do say that intense close engagement with things does provide
the most human satisfaction.” The psychologists are right. McKibben
describes himself as “loving novelty” and yet “craving depth”, the
contemporary predicament in a nutshell.

Ironically, the companies most active in denying us our craving for depth, the
great distracters – Microsoft, Google, IBM, Intel – are trying to do
something about this. They have formed the Information Overload Research
Group, “dedicated to promoting solutions to e-mail overload and
interruptions”. None of this will work, of course, because of the
overwhelming economic forces involved. People make big money out of
distracting us. So what can be done?

The first issue is the determination of the distracters to create young
distractees. Television was the first culprit. Tests clearly show that a
switched-on television reduces the quality and quantity of interaction
between children and their parents. The internet multiplies the effect a
thousandfold. Paradoxically, the supreme information provider also has the
effect of reducing information intake.

Bauerlein is 49. As a child, he says, he learnt about the Vietnam war from
Walter Cronkite, the great television news anchor of the time. Now teenagers
just go to their laptops on coming home from school and sink into their
online cocoon. But this isn’t the informational paradise dreamt of by Bill
Gates and Google: 90% of sites visited by teenagers are social networks.
They are immersed not in knowledge but in “gossip and social banter”.

“They don’t,” says Bauerlein, “grow up.” They are “living off the thrill of
peer attention. Meanwhile, their intellects refuse the cultural and civic
inheritance that has made us what we are now”.

The hyper-connectivity of the young is bewildering. Jackson tells me that one
study looked at five years of e-mail activity of a 24-year-old. He was found
to have connections with 11.7m people. Most of these connections would be
pretty threadbare. But that, in a way, is the point. All internet
connections are threadbare. They lack the complexity and depth of real-world
interactions. This is concealed by the language.

Join Facebook or MySpace and you suddenly have “friends” all over the place.
Of course, you don’t. These are just casual, tenuous electronic pings.
Nothing could be further removed from the idea of friendship.

These connections are severed as quickly as they are taken up – with the click
of a mouse. Jackson and everyone else I spoke to was alarmed by the
potential impact on real-world relationships. Teenagers are being groomed to
think others can be picked up on a whim and dropped because of a mood or
some slight offence. The fear is that the idea of sticking with another
through thick and thin – the very essence of friendship and love – will come
to seem absurd, uncool, meaningless.

One irony that lies behind all this is the myth that children are good at this
stuff. Adults often joke that their 10-year-old has to fix the computer. But
it’s not true. Studies show older people are generally more adept with
computers than younger. This is because, like all multitaskers, the kids are
deluding themselves into thinking that busy-ness is depth when, in fact,
they are skimming the surface of cyberspace as surely as they are skimming
the surface of life. It takes an adult imagination to discriminate, to make
judgments; and those are the only skills that really matter.

The concern of all these writers and thinkers is that it is precisely these
skills that will vanish from the world as we become infantilised
cyber-serfs, our entertainments and impulses maintained and controlled by
the techno-geek aristocracy. They have all noted – either in themselves or
in others – diminishing attention spans, inability to focus, a loss of the
meditative mode. “I can’t read War and Peace any more,” confessed one of
Carr’s friends. “I’ve lost the ability to do that. Even a blog post of more
than three or four paragraphs is too much to absorb. I skim it.”

The computer is training us not to attend, to drown in the sea of information
rather than to swim. Jackson thinks this can be fixed. The brain is
malleable. Just as it can be trained to be distracted, so it can be trained
to pay attention. Education and work can be restructured to teach and
propagate the skills of concentration and focus. People can be taught to
turn off, to ignore the beep and the ping.

Bauerlein, dismayed by his distracted students, is not optimistic. Multiple
distraction might, he admits, be a phase, and in time society will
self-correct. But the sheer power of the forces of distraction is such that
he thinks this will not happen.

This, for him, puts democracy at risk. It is a form of government that puts “a
heavy burden of responsibility on our citizens”. But if they think Paris is
in England and they can’t find Iraq on a map because their world is a social
network of “friends” – examples of appalling ignorance recently found in
American teenagers – how can they be expected to shoulder that burden?

This may all be a moral panic, a severe case of the older generation wagging
its finger at the young. It was ever thus. But what is new is the assiduity
with which companies and institutions are selling us the tools of
distraction. Every new device on the market is, to return to Eliot, “Filled
with fancies and empty of meaning / Tumid apathy with no concentration”.

These things do make our lives easier, but only by destroying the very selves
that should be protesting at every distraction, demanding peace, quiet and
contemplation. The distracters have product to shift, and it’s shifting. On
the train to Wakefield, with my new 3G iPhone, distracted from distraction
by distraction, I saw the future and, to my horror, it worked.

24 nous Estats a Europa, des de 1900

El Cercle d’Estudis Sobiranistes ha penjat al seu nou web una animació que expressa d’una manera molt gràfica l’evolució del mapa polític europeu i que desmitifica el principi sagrat de la intangibilitat de les fronteres dels Estats.

En efecte, el mapa mosta l’any de naixement dels 24 Estats europeus nascuts des del segle XX, als quals s’hi podria sumar Armènia, Azerbaitjan i Geòrgia, que també són membres del Consell d’Europa i que van aconseguir la seva independència a principis dels anys 90. Ens trobem, per tant que 25 dels 48 Estats membres del Consell d’Europa (un 52%) s’han independitzat d’ençà del 1900, sense comptar la Santa Seu i Kosovo, que no són membres d’aquesta organització internacional. Un fet que, independentment de les circumstàncies de cada cas, ens hauria de fer entendre que el naixement d’una Catalunya independent no és una entelèquia que va en contra de la dinàmica d’integració política i econòmica d’Europa. De fet, és just el contrari.[@more@]

Una candidata de debò

Després de veure el
minut final dels dos candidats a la Presidència del Govern espanyol en
el seu primer debat cara a cara, m’ha semblat pertinent penjar al bloc un vídeo
amb el discurs final de Hillary
Clinton
en el darrer de les desenes de debats que han celebrat fins ara,
juntament amb Barack Obama,
en aquesta carrera per la nominació demòcrata a la Presidència
dels Estats Units.

Un vídeo que demostra clarament la distància que ens separa dels
Estats Units en alguns aspectes del funcionament de la democràcia i que
també posa de manifest la talla política, l’empatia que generen
i la capacitat de reacció dels candidats a la nominació presidencial
i, en especial, de Hillary Rodham Clinton.

L’agilitat, la proximitat i la familiaritat amb que s’expressa Hillary Clinton
contrasta amb l’encarcarament, la posició distant i la incapacitat d’arribar
als electors dels dos candidats espanyols, més preocupats per no perdre’s
en la lectura del seu discurs que per trasmetre l’emoció i el sentiment
que els motiva a encapçalar els seus respectius partits. Un contrast
que demostra la gran política que és Hillary Clinton i la gran
presidenta dels Estats Units que espero que serà.

[@more@]

Una candidata de debò

Després de veure el
minut final dels dos candidats a la Presidència del Govern espanyol en
el seu primer debat cara a cara, m’ha semblat pertinent penjar al bloc un vídeo
amb el discurs final de Hillary
Clinton
en el darrer de les desenes de debats que han celebrat fins ara,
juntament amb Barack Obama,
en aquesta carrera per la nominació demòcrata a la Presidència
dels Estats Units.

Un vídeo que demostra clarament la distància que ens separa dels
Estats Units en alguns aspectes del funcionament de la democràcia i que
també posa de manifest la talla política, l’empatia que generen
i la capacitat de reacció dels candidats a la nominació presidencial
i, en especial, de Hillary Rodham Clinton.

L’agilitat, la proximitat i la familiaritat amb que s’expressa Hillary Clinton
contrasta amb l’encarcarament, la posició distant i la incapacitat d’arribar
als electors dels dos candidats espanyols, més preocupats per no perdre’s
en la lectura del seu discurs que per trasmetre l’emoció i el sentiment
que els motiva a encapçalar els seus respectius partits. Un contrast
que demostra la gran política que és Hillary Clinton i la gran
presidenta dels Estats Units que espero que serà.

[@more@]

Democràcia: necessita millorar

En un moment com l’actual, que tornem a reviure el procés d’il·legalització
de l’esquerra abertzale que ja vam conèixer durant l’etapa més
autoritària del Govern Aznar, em sembla més que adient de penjar
l’anunci
que ha produït Amnistia Internacional
i que precisament ha estat "censurat"
pel Ministre Joan Clos, número 2 de la candidatura del PSC per Barcelona
al Congrés dels Diputats. Ni les acusacions de tortures, ni les limitacions a la llibertat d’expressió
que estem veient darrerament (el Jueves, crema de fotos del rei, anunci d’AI…),
ni la suspensió de facto dels drets polítics d’una part
important de la ciutadania d’Euskadi, ni la prohibició de consultar al
poble sobre el futur polític d’un territori no semblen símptomes
d’una democràcia avançada ni consolidada. Iel més greu
és que mirant tant a la dreta com a l’esquerra tampoc s’entreveuen gaires
possibilitats de millora.

[@more@]

El text en cursiva correspon a la versió
dels fets
d’Amnistia Internacional.

Què ha succeït?

Des de fa vuit mesos, l’spot d’Amnistia Internacional "El Poder de Tu
Voz" no es pot emetre als canals estatals de televisió. El Ministeri
d’Indústria, Turisme i Comerç obstaculitza la seva emissió
denegant l’exempció de còmput publicitari. No solament nega el
caràcter de servei públic de l’anunci, amb la qual cosa s’impedeix
la seva emissió gratuïta, sinó que a més el qualifica
com a publicitat política. L’esmentada qualificació suposa considerar
il·legal l’emissió per part de qualsevol canal de televisió
(article 9. 1c llei 25/1994) i sancionable com a infracció greu (article
20.2 de la mateixa llei).

Què ha dit el Govern?

El Govern diu, en primer lloc, que la campanya d’AI no té caràcter
de servei públic perquè els drets humans no poden defensar-se
mitjançant la crítica o generant controvèrsia, el qual
determinaria que l’spot no pugui emetre’s en TV com a publicitat gratuïta.

Segons l’Informe del Ministeri: "no cap dubte de què el missatge
principal a l’anunci (…) no és el de defensar determinats drets, sinó
afirmar que aquests estan sent violats per determinats dirigents i no per d’altres
(…).Además, afirma que la denúncia dels drets humans, per tenir
finalitat pública, ha de mancar de "controvèrsia". Per
a això, fa una comparació, fonament de dret que el caràcter
benèfic d’un anunci per recolzar nens malalts quedaria totalment desvirtuat
si a més denunciés a la farmacèutiques que posen obstacles
per a la seva curació.

Això és incorrecte, d’una banda perquè l’spot d’AI no
realitza cap crítica directa a ningú, sinó que només
enumera drets de la Declaració Universal de Drets Humans i indica el
que haurien de fer aquests governants segons les lleis internacionals. En qualsevol
cas, difícilment no pot realitzar-se una campanya de defensa dels drets
humans sense denunciar les violacions que es produeixen dels mateixos. La crítica
o denúncia és una forma habitual, lògica i necessària
en la defensa dels drets humans. I defensar els drets humans és un servei
públic.

El segon motiu en què es basa la posició inicial de l’Administració,
que ha de ser revisada pel Ministre d’Indústria (veure nota de premsa
del Ministeri, últim paràgraf), consisteix que es diu que l’spot
ha de ser qualificat com a publicitat política i per tant prohibida,
el qual determina no solament que no pugui emetre’s en TV com a publicitat gratuïta,
sinó una mica molt més greu: que la seva emissió per qualsevol
emissora de TV pugui ser sancionada amb multes de fins a 300.000 euros.

L’esmentada qualificació suposa considerar il·legal l’emissió
per part de qualsevol canal de televisió (article 9. 1c llei 25/1994)
i sancionable com a infracció greu (article 20.2 de la mateixa llei).

Segons Amnistia Internacional els drets humans són el consens bàsic
sobre el qual se sosté tota la legalitat internacional. Per això,
defensar els drets humans no té ni pot tenir en principi cap finalitat
política, ja que només es tracta de defensar les regles del joc
universals.

Què ha dit Amnistia Internacional?

La qualificació de publicitat política prohibida vulnera drets
com la comunicació lliure d’informació veraç i la prohibició
de la censura prèvia. Durant aquests vuit mesos no s’ha pogut emetre
l’anunci i continua sense no poder-se emetre per televisions estatals.

L’objectiu d’Amnistia Internacional amb aquest anunci no és traslladar
una opinió política, sinó difondre drets humans universals.
De fet el que diuen les autoritats en l’spot són articles de la Declaració
Universal de Drets Humans, dels quals es compleix aquest any seu 60 Aniversari.

Òbviament, esperem que l’spot faci reflexionar les persones sobre el
grau de compliment de la Declaració Universal per part d’aquests governs.
No s’ha de confondre "política" amb "respecte als drets
humans".

Què és l’exempció de còmput publicitari?

Les cadenes estatals que accepten els spots de les organitzacions sense ànim
de lucre requereixen la certificació esmentada perquè la seva
durada no es tingui en compte com a publicitat comercial; el que tècnicament
es denomina "exempció de còmput". El paper del Ministeri
consisteix a acceptar o denegar aquesta certificació. Un anunci (presentat
per qualsevol organització) la finalitat del qual sigui la del servei
públic o caràcter benèfic i es difongui de forma gratuïta,
pot aconseguir l’exempció de còmput publicitari.

Què és publicitat política prohibida?

Es considera publicitat política o propaganda la que busca l’adhesió
a una ideologia, a Espanya sol es permet la publicitat política dels
partits i només en període electoral. És a dir, el Govern
considera que la Declaració Universal de Drets Humans a boca de dirigents
mundials és l’adhesió a una ideologia política i podria
suposar un atac a algun grup polític, com diu el Ministeri en la seva
nota de premsa.

Quins antecedents hi ha a Espanya?

Segons ha pogut saber Amnistia Internacional, fins ara el Ministeri no ha negat
l’exempció de còmput a cap de les principals ONG internacionals
per motius polítics.

Tanmateix, l’any 2003, el Govern també va negar l’exempció de
còmput a l’anunci "Posa’t a la seva pell" d’Amnistia Internacional
sobre maltractaments racistes a Espanya. En aquell moment, el Govern de llavors
va obstaculitzar la seva emissió i no va justificar la seva negativa.
L’organització va recórrer aquesta decisió davant dels
tribunals, que van donar la raó a Amnistia Internacional en considerar
que la negació de l’"exempció de còmput" havia
de ser motivada. La sentència està pendent de recurs davant del
Tribunal Suprem.

Xq, president?

Un grup d’alumnes de 4t d’ESO de l’IES Celrà, entre els quals la meva cosina Laura, van entrevistar divendres passat el president de la Generalitat, José Montilla, en el marc del concurs “El País de los Estudiantes”.

L’entrevista, que va ser enregistrada al mateix Palau de la Generalitat, s’ha emès per tots els canals de la Xarxa de Televisions Locals, per COMRàdio i per La Malla.

[@more@]

Els altres independentistes

Continuant amb la sèrie d’articles sobre la independència de Catalunya, en aquesta ocasió reprodueixo l’article d’Odei Antxustegi-Etxearte que apareix avui a El Punt en el qual quatre catalans immigrats expliquen per què defensen la sobirania del país.

D'esquerra a dreta: Saoka Kingolo, Pedro Morón, Diego Arcos i Patrícia Gabancho.

«Poques societats com la dels Països Catalans per acollir i incorporar gent forana.» Diego Arcos, president del Casal Argentí a Barcelona, amplia l’argument afegint-hi: «Vosaltres mateixos, catalans i catalanes de soca-rel, sou immigrants al vostre país, pel fet que ni tan sols podeu viure en la vostra llengua a casa vostra.» Arcos va néixer a l’altra banda del planeta, però és independentista. Nodreix el sector social cada vegada més nombrós de catalans nouvinguts que es decanten per aquesta opció política. Una actitud ideològica que no deixa de generar perplexitat entre ciutadans d’arrels profundament catalanes que defensen posicions més tèbies. És per això que Saoka Kingolo, un activista pels drets humans amb una llarga trajectòria a Catalunya, lamenta que molta gent tingui la imatge prefixada del nouvingut amb barretina que branda l’estelada i no vulgui aprofundir en el raonament que el fa decantar la balança.

Kingolo va néixer al Congo, però els seus quatre avis eren angolesos. Va arribar a Catalunya el 1988, i no va trigar gaire a considerar que «el fet de canviar de país» no afecta una convicció que té profundament assumida: «Tots els pobles del món tenen dret a l’autodeterminació. Jo venia d’un país dominat completament, i vaig aterrar en un altre que també ho està, però en un grau molt inferior.» Per Kingolo, el que varia és la «intensitat amb què el poble és oprimit», perquè n’hi ha que són «víctimes de la dominació exterior però gaudeixen d’un nivell de benestar que fa diluir la necessitat d’autodeterminació». Quan va posar els peus a Catalunya, de seguida va esforçar-se amb el català, i es va acabar de convèncer que la llengua és la «porta d’entrada» al país. «Vaig aprendre quatre paraules i em vaig adonar que era màgic: ja tenies amistats», recorda. Molts dels paisans africans d’en Saoka, que aleshores rebutjaven la seva actitud perquè consideraven que el perdrien com a membre de la comunitat, quinze anys després comencen a parlar-li català. «Noto que l’independentisme creix», assegura.

Des del principi, Kingolo també va dedicar-se a ampliar els pocs coneixements que tenia sobre «el fet diferencial català». Només després d’anys d’activisme associatiu va passar a la «militància activa». El 2003 es va afiliar a ERC, partit amb què havia col·laborat i que havia assessorat durant molt de temps. Va ser un pas molt raonat, insisteix, que va fer quan va veure clar que «dins del moviment independentista català tenia un espai».

Pedro Morón és periodista i president de l’associació Catalunya Acord. Va arribar el 1961, una època en què a Granada, la seva terra natal, «la fam niava pertot arreu». Morón va adonar-se de les particularitats del país «immediatament», tot i que tan sols tenia deu anys i la majoria dels seus paisans pensaven que eren a Espanya. Milita a CDC des de fa 15 anys, i defensa que Catalunya ha de ser independent «per la seva història, tradicions, cultura i llengua pròpies». «És evident que és una nació a la qual al seu dia es va robar l’estat per la força de les armes», remata. Morón sosté que «llegir la història d’aquest país hauria de ser suficient per convèncer qualsevol que Catalunya es mereix la independència». Però, en qualsevol cas, pensa que «després de més de quaranta anys de conviure amb autòctons, és molt difícil no ser independentista, o com a mínim catalanista o nacionalista». Aquest santboià també creu que cada cop hi ha més nouvinguts independentistes, «encara que està costant molt». Argumenta que Paco Candel o l’associació Els Altres Andalusos, de què també forma part, «han fet passos importants» a favor de la integració. No obstant això, condemna que «els responsables polítics de gran part de l’àrea metropolitana de Barcelona han intentat, i intenten, amb la nova immigració, que el gran bloc d’immigrants mantingui els seus orígens, que es continuïn sentint espanyols».

L’escriptora Patrícia Gabancho va aterrar a Catalunya el 1974. A Buenos Aires ja havia entrat en contacte amb catalans, i per això les nocions de llengua amb què va arribar van ajudar-la a introduir-se en el món cultural i periodístic que, a les acaballes de la dictadura i la transició, parlava català. «Era una època amb molts radicalismes –recorda–, la gent estava situada a l’extrem de l’esquerra.» Segons diu, «l’opció més coherent era la independentista». I per aquesta raó va militar en moviments sobiranistes. Anys després, va pensar que una millora de l’autogovern «podia funcionar». Però el procés de reforma de l’Estatut l’ha feta tornar als orígens: l’independentisme. Diu que està demostrat que l’antipatia cap a Catalunya «està molt més a flor de pell del que semblava». A més, considera que quedar-se a l’Estat significaria «renunciar a un projecte de plenitud de Catalunya». Avui, Gabancho no se sent propera a cap partit, i si pogués votar diu que li costaria molt.

Diego Arcos comenta que quan una persona migra, en el 90% dels casos és fill d’un país que no pot controlar les seves riqueses. «Jo vaig sortir de l’Argentina el 1989 i vaig caure en un altre poble oprimit», subratlla. Arcos, que ha sol·licitat l’adhesió a ERC, al·lega que «els mateixos interessos» que mantenen Catalunya com està «escanyen» el seu país d’origen. I troba «normal» que els immigrats, que tenen el futur sotmès a la llei espanyola d’estrangeria, lluitin pels seus drets amb uns catalans que pateixen des de la instauració dels decrets de Nova Planta. Arcos constata que, quan arriba, «l’immigrant ha de triar en quin projecte històric inclou el seu projecte personal: l’espanyol o el dels Països Catalans». Com molts altres, ell va elegir ser català.

El fet d’immigrar no va afectar la convicció de Kingolo que «tots els pobles del món tenen dret a l’autodeterminació»

La identitat no és «una composició química»

Com defineix un català d’origen estranger la seva identitat? La resposta pot arribar a ser tan simple com complexa: cadascú a la seva manera. Pedro Morón s’autodefineix com un «català de Granada». De fet, ho ha proclamat en un llibre: Yo, catalán de Granada. Perquè es considera «granadino de naixement i català per convicció i decisió pròpia». L’escriptora Patrícia Gabancho és «argentinocatalana». «Continuo sent molt argentina», però és un fet que està «impregnada de la vida catalana», en el terreny personal i en el professional. Diego Arcos es proclama «argentí de naixença, migrant per opció i català per decisió». Defensa que va viure un procés d’«autodeterminació personal». Sempre que li demanen que es defineixi, Saoka Kingolo recorda Amin Maalouf: «Sóc la suma de tot: 100% congolès i 100% català.» «No sóc una composició química que té un percentatge d’aquí i d’allà», diu. Se sent «totalment» dels dos llocs. I és que la complexitat humana no hi entén, de matemàtiques.

[@more@]

Next entries »